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Good Burger 2 Film Review 2023

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Good Burger 2 Film Review

To kick off Good Burger 2 film, we have After Dexter’s (Kenan Thompson) most recent business endeavor goes belly-up, he goes back to Good Burger in the hopes of getting some help with Ed (Kel Mitchell), whom stayed at the beloved fast food shop. Ed, as owner, receives substantial offers to franchise Good Burger. However, the business has been his whole life, and his persistent refusals are greeted with more nefarious plots.

Good Burger 2

Confident in his best buddy and Good Burger, Ed is caught between two worlds as he faces the aggressive incentives from Cecil (Lil Rel Howery), a businessman working for an unknown employer, and Dexter’s own greedy ambitions to become rich quick.

After Ed is persuaded to sign Cecil’s contract without reading it, thanks to Dexter’s infamously terrible business practice’s, the optimism they had gained via false promises is shattered when they learn they have sold Good Burger to MegaCorp.

Dexter and Ed are up against MegaCorp’s plans to turn Good Burger into an AI-driven capitalist nightmare after they lose their positions at the original shop, and the company to Katt Boswell (Jillian Bell), who is the sister of the the initial film’s opponent, Kurt from Mondo Burger.

Fundamentally, “Good Burger 2” is a journey down memory lane. The screenplay is filled with references to the previous film, from callback gags to cameos from familiar faces like Roxanne (Carmen Electra), who is now Ed’s babysitter, and Connie Muldoon (Lori Beth Denberg), the big-haired, rapid-fire client.

“Good Burger 2” nevertheless manages to make audiences laugh with its trademark ferocity, even if it relies on tired gags. Mitchell brings his trademark physical humor to the character, which he plays again to great success. As a fun throwback and effective counterpoint to Dexter’s growth, Ed’s antics in this sequel—which include headstands, food battles, peculiar gaits, and energetic facial expressions—keep things fresh and enjoyable.

Good Burger2

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As a whole, Dexter is selfish. It has been a total of five years, eight months, and thirty-two days that he had last seen Ed when he comes to Good Burger feeling down on his fortune. Still, he comes hoping to get a job and plot to steal Ed’s hard work for his own benefit.

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The plotline involving their rather poisonous interpersonal dynamic does not once cast doubt on Thompson’s humorous abilities. The film’s usually campy tone is kept current by Thompson’s sardonic remarks and classic vocal affectations, even if Mitchell’s gallivanting exploits are more spectacular.

Actors report feeling as if they were never absent. The connection from the previous film is still there, and it’s nice to see that they are still believable as adults; the film’s humorous core—the characters’ naiveté—doesn’t seem forced or insincere.

The humor is still there, but “Good Burger 2” doesn’t advance the storyline of the original film in any meaningful way. Despite their years, Dexter and Ed seem to have been whisked away from the original picture and thrust into unfamiliar situations.

An chance to inject some maturity and growth into the film’s otherwise predictable comedy was lost when the unease of Dexter’s exploitation of Ed was just an arrow on an unfulfilled emotional blueprint. Reviving the film raises the issue of why it was ever considered.

Good Burger 2 Film

In the service sector, artificial intelligence (AI) and technology substitution have a common theme: the vast machine of capitalism devalues human workers due to their demands for appropriate wage, “bathroom breaks” and “complaints.”

Katt delivers all of this in a very pointed diatribe, but she also makes light of the many ways machines might fail or be hijacked. It competes, in a superficial but recognizable way, with the film’s larger message and motive by pitting large companies against tiny enterprises.

“Good Burger 2” fails to go far enough from its formulaic formula despite being a heartfelt comedic sequel jam-packed with entertaining cameos and ridiculousness. There are a few good chuckles and a dash of nostalgia, but nothing really noteworthy.

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